Model of a City in Civil War, a book of poems, is available now from Sarabande Books and other retailers.

Model Of A City In Civil War

Also available at Amazon.com

and at IndieBound.org

Publishers Weekly

"Day navigates the tensions between breadth and precision, and between the historical and the personal, in his excellent debut collection. Through a range of forms, he creates a liminal space wherein references to strange historical anecdotes share a stage with more introspective and personal utterances. Through this balancing act, what seems remote becomes highly accessible and mysteriously familiar…In the process of weaving his materials together, he draws his readers into a sort of collective memory, thus fostering a sense of community…Day masterfully conjoins the still life with the moving landscape, the expansive with the infinitesimal…This act of cracking and reassembling is a constant struggle, but there’s merit in the struggle itself."

Publishers Weekly (April, 2015)

2015-04-21T15:03:43+00:00

Publishers Weekly (April, 2015)

“Day navigates the tensions between breadth and precision, and between the historical and the personal, in his excellent debut collection. Through a range of forms, he creates a liminal space wherein references to strange historical anecdotes share a stage with more introspective and personal utterances. Through this balancing act, what seems remote becomes highly accessible and mysteriously familiar…In the process of weaving his materials together, he draws his readers into a sort of collective memory,

 » Read more about: Publishers Weekly  »

David Baker

"Adam Day’s debut volume of poetry bucks the current pandemic of terminal irony, but does so with alertness to paradox and mystery–those things irony becomes when it grows up. In varied formal moves and unified tone, Day reminds us how rewarding serious poetry can be and how much we have missed it."

"As Day’s poems gather, taking stock, making inventory, he reveals the fundamental paradox of his method: familiarity crossed with estranging clarity produces, in the hands of this fine new poet, an eerie intensity and a distinguishing grace."

– David Baker, author of Never-Ending Birds

2015-04-09T16:24:46+00:00

– David Baker, author of Never-Ending Birds

“Adam Day’s debut volume of poetry bucks the current pandemic of terminal irony, but does so with alertness to paradox and mystery–those things irony becomes when it grows up. In varied formal moves and unified tone, Day reminds us how rewarding serious poetry can be and how much we have missed it.”

“As Day’s poems gather, taking stock, making inventory, he reveals the fundamental paradox of his method: familiarity crossed with estranging clarity produces,

 » Read more about: David Baker  »

Bruce Smith

"These poems have great range, great texture, and great unpredictable pleasures. It’s unusual for a first book to extend the repertoire of what can be done in a poem, but Model of a City in Civil War does exactly that."

– Bruce Smith, author of Devotions

2015-04-09T16:24:11+00:00

– Bruce Smith, author of Devotions

“These poems have great range, great texture, and great unpredictable pleasures. It’s unusual for a first book to extend the repertoire of what can be done in a poem, but Model of a City in Civil War does exactly that.”

 » Read more about: Bruce Smith  »

Kathleen Graber

"In his haunting debut collection, Adam Day weaves a detailed surrealistic landscape ruled by harsh seasons and harsher happenings. Often rendered in imagistic micro-vignettes and character studies, these poems arrive both as urgent cautionary dispatches from a parallel world and reminders of the brutal and too-familiar events and absurdities of our own. . . . What seems at first glance to be a view into a wholly other realm steadily becomes a shockingly timely, searing meditation on human nature as it manifests itself in our daily lives and public history."

– Kathleen Graber, author of The Eternal City

2015-04-09T16:23:42+00:00

– Kathleen Graber, author of The Eternal City

“In his haunting debut collection, Adam Day weaves a detailed surrealistic landscape ruled by harsh seasons and harsher happenings. Often rendered in imagistic micro-vignettes and character studies, these poems arrive both as urgent cautionary dispatches from a parallel world and reminders of the brutal and too-familiar events and absurdities of our own. . . . What seems at first glance to be a view into a wholly other realm steadily becomes a shockingly timely, searing meditation on human nature as it manifests itself in our daily lives and public history.”

 » Read more about: Kathleen Graber  »

Adam Day is the author of Model of a City in Civil War (Sarabande Books), and is the recipient of a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship for Badger, Apocrypha, a PEN Emerging Writers Award, and an Al Smith Fellowship from the Kentucky Arts Council. His poems have appeared in Boston Review, The Kenyon Review, American Poetry Review, ​Lana Turner, Poetry London, ​The Iowa Review, and elsewhere. He coordinates The Baltic Writing Residency in Latvia, Scotland, and the Bernheim Arboretum & Research Forest.

Dates

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Previous Works / Publishings

BOOKS

Model of a City in Civil War

Model of a City in Civil War

Badger, Apocrypha

Badger, Apocrypha

REVIEWS and INTERVIEWS

POEMS

LINKS TO SOME COMPELLING ORGANIZATIONS, WRITING, &c.

Open Letter Books:  “Open Letter—the University of Rochester‘s nonprofit, literary translation press—is one of only a handful of publishing houses dedicated to increasing access to world literature for English readers. Publishing ten titles in translation each year and running an online literary website called Three Percent.”

Three Percent “Three Percent launched in the summer of 2007 with the lofty goal of becoming a destination for readers, editors, and translators interested in finding out about modern and contemporary international literature. The motivating force behind the website is the view that reading literature from other countries is vital to maintaining a vibrant book culture and to increasing the exchange of ideas among cultures.”

Three Percent Podcast “The Three Percent Podcast is a weekly conversation about new books, literary events, the publishing scene, and other random things. Chad W. Post of Open Letter Books and Tom Roberge of New Directions keep things irreverent, informed, and funny in a podcast that’ll keep you up to date on the international literary world. Maybe.”

Site Reading: Fiction, Art, Social Form (Princeton University Press, Nov. 2015) by David J. AlworthSite Reading offers a new method of literary and cultural interpretation and a new theory of narrative setting by examining five sites—supermarkets, dumps, roads, ruins, and asylums—that have been crucial to American literature and visual art since the mid-twentieth century. Against the traditional understanding of setting as a static background for narrative action and character development, David Alworth argues that sites figure in novels as social agents. Engaging a wide range of social and cultural theorists, especially Bruno Latour and Erving Goffman, Site Reading examines how the literary figuration of real, material environments reorients our sense of social relations. To read the sites of fiction, Alworth demonstrates, is to reveal literature as a profound sociological resource, one that simultaneously models and theorizes collective life.

“Supermarket Sociology” by David J. Alworth in New Literary History: This article suggests that an unlikely site, the contemporary supermarket, is central to the sociological theory of Bruno Latour. It then examines the role of the supermarket in literary and visual art, arguing that the work of Don DeLillo and Andy Warhol, among others, simultaneously clarifies and complicates Latour’s main claims about actors and agency in the social world.

“Pynchon’s Malta” by David J. Alworth in Post 45: Examining Pynchon’s strange and fascinating treatment of Malta as a ruin, this article argues that the novelist was pursuing a certain paradox, representation without resemblance, that animated site-specific art in the 1960s and 70s, the work of Robert Smithson in particular. Tracking the links between Pynchon and Smithson, it then goes on to elaborate a method of literary analysis that it calls “site reading.”

Audio: Readings in the Parlor: Absalom, Absalom!, A close reading by Prof. David Alworth

David Alworth on Caroline Levine’s Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network: Form’s Function in the Los Angeles Review of Books: “The essay explores the intersection of literary studies and design thinking through an engagement with Caroline Levine’s book.”

“The Look of the Book” by David J. Alworth, in Public Books: “Covers are the interface between the readers we once were and the book fetishists we remain, even in the digital era.”

Melville in the Asylum: Literature, Sociology, Reading” by David J. Alworth in American Literary History: This essay argues for a new understanding of the relationship between imaginative literature and sociology by examining sociologist Erving Goffman’s engagement with Herman Melville. First, it provides an account of Goffman’s project, suggesting that he was remarkably attentive to the force of nonhuman entities (e.g. material things, built structures) within the “interaction order,” the zone of face-to-face exchange between individuals. Goffman’s attention to the nonhuman, I argue, aligns him with Bruno Latour and other sociologists associated with Actor-Network-Theory, and it helps to account for his interest in Melville. I contend that he viewed Melville as a quasi-sociologist, a keen analyst of social interaction, whose fiction is especially attuned to the role of the nonhuman. I play out this understanding of Melville by analyzing several key works (i.e. White-Jacket, Moby-Dick, “I and My Chimney,” Mardi, and Typee), and I conclude by suggesting that a new sociology of literature might understand authors like Melville less as objects of analysis than as allies in the endeavor to apprehend social experience.

“Hip to Post ‘45.” by David J. Alworth in Contemporary Literature: “Michael Szalay’s Hip Figures: A Literary History of the Democratic Party (2012) is one of five books in the Stanford series, which is edited by Florence Dore and Szalay himself. As such, it not only constitutes an exemplary case of Post45 scholarship but also provides an occasion to reiterate Hungerford’s question: Where are we now? What is the current state of scholarly work on the period formerly known as contemporary? Hip Figures showcases what Hungerford called “the solid dominance of historicism” in her 2008 survey of the field, while reminding us that, to use her words, “close reading remains at the heart of… critical practice” for this generation of scholars (416).”

 

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